Bertrand Latrobe

Male Abt 1565 -


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  • Name Bertrand Latrobe  [1
    Born Abt 1565  Monbéqui, Tarn-et-Garonne, Midi-Pyrénées, France Find all individuals with events at this location  [2
    Gender Male 
    Died Villenouvelle de Fossat lez Montauban, France Find all individuals with events at this location  [3, 4
    Notes 
    • According to Jean-Jacques Benoît, Bertrand was born in 1560. He lived between 1592 and 1595 in the mill of the Lord of Montbartier141 He died at the end of 1627 or early 1628 in
      Villenouvelle de Fossat lez Montauban.137,140,142 This time period is according to family archives which include a contract dated 18 January 1628 for measuring the land for purposes of inheritance and a contract dated 31 January 1628 for dividing the real estate to the heirs. Both contracts involved his children. According to Jean-Jacques Benoît he died in 1630.

      He is the one ancestor known to all Latrobe descendants today and at least to all those who attended the Latrobe International Symposium (LIS) on May 7 to 11, 1997 in Paris, Versailles and Montauban, France. (This was written in 1999. Since then our archivist cousin, Michel de Lafon-Boutary, found near the end of 2001 citation #422 dated 2 January 1664 showing that Jacques Latrobe, ancestor of the Catholic branch of Portet-sur-Garonne, was not the sixth son of Bertrand born in 1607, but belonged to the Mauvezin branch descended from Pierre Latrobe, most probably half brother or first cousin of Pierre Latrobe Garguy).

      Bertrand is also a major relay in the genealogical chain of the Latrobe family, since remembrance of him has been brought by word of mouth until today; mainly because he was a Protestant leader and played an active part in the defense of Montauban besieged by the army of King Louis XIII of France in 1621.

      Another important reason why he is remembered in the family may be that he was married when very young, only about 19, had numerous children, seven sons and three daughters, most of them surviving until adult age and themselves having many children, and all being told over and over again about their heroic ancestor, Bertrand, and the part he played in the siege of Montauban.

      A third reason might lie in the fact that he introduced a new job within the family. After his
      great-great-grandfather, Jehan Latrobe, who introduced the new job of miller in a farmer family, and after his father, also Jehan Latrobe, who introduced the new job of royal notary and should be regarded as the ancestor of the numerous and sometimes eminent lawyers of the family, Bertrand introduced the new job of carpenter, mainly involved in building water mills (and boats, as indicated by the old French word "fustier" used in #199 dated 1618), and should be regarded as the ancestor of the numerous and sometimes distinguished architects and engineers of the family. Moreover, by reference to his capabilities in command shown in the defense of Montauban in 1621, he should be also regarded as the ancestor of the numerous officers the Latrobe family gave to the armies of several countries.

      Nevertheless like his grandfather, his great-grandfather and his great-great-grandfather, Bertrand began working as a miller at Monbéqui. When he married Anne Gasc in 1584, according to #74 the marriage agreement took place in the house of Pierre Gasc (presumably her grandfather) located within the village of Fossat near Montauban. In 1616, according to #195, Bertrand and Anne are said to be inhabitants of Villenouvelle de Fossat lez Montauban. And in 1618, according to #199, Bertrand was a master carpenter.

      Nevertheless if we look at the map of Montauban area, we cannot find any place or village called Fossat or Villenouvelle de Fossat. The reason for that is that in the mid 1500's, the town of Montauban was surrounded by its ancient walls built after the town was founded by Alphonse Jourdain, Count of Toulouse, in 1144. On its northern part, the wall followed the bank of a small river, the eastern tributary of the Tarn River. On the northern bank, there were three villages: Montmurat at the confluence, Fossat upwards toward the East and then St. Antoine.

      After St. Bartholomew day in 1572 where a huge number of Protestants were slaughtered everywhere in France, Henri de Bourbon, chief of all French Protestants (who was to become the King of France, Henri IV, in 1589) decided to strengthen the defense of Montauban, one of the biggest places controlled by the Protestants in France. Thus he ordered new fortifications to be built and, in doing so, incorporated the three villages of Montmurat, Fossat and St. Antoine inside the new walls. About the same time, the tributary of the Tarn River was crossed by a new bridge, well known today as the "Pont des Consuls", which connected the old town with the new district called "Villenouvelle". Consequently the names of these villages disappeared on the map of Montauban area, and they are only kept today as names of streets within the Montauban district "Villenouvelle", which is indeed one among the oldest ones today. Note that the new fortifications built by Henri de Bourbon around 1580 were razed by order of Richelieu after Montauban was submitted in 1629 to the royal power of his son, Louis XIII, which is the reason why the walls are not visible on the Cassini map established on the late 1700's.

      As a result we now know precisely where Bertrand Latrobe lived with his wife and his numerous children. Additionally, according to #473 relating to the sale in 1682 by Jeanne Latrobe to her cousin, Jean Latrobe, of a house located on the Rue Delgarric and contiguous on the three other sides with three houses or goods owned by Bertrand's children or grandchildren leads us to believe that it deals with Bertrand's house. We now have a better understanding how, as a master carpenter, he played a great role, under the command of the Protestants chiefs, Duke of Rohan and Duke of La Force, in the defense of Montauban besieged by the army of King Louis XIII in the fall 1621 (see #212).

      From #78a (1592) which was recently found in mid 2002, we learn that, from April 27th, 1592, and for a duration of three years and three months, Bertrand and his family rented their home at Villenouvelle de Fossat and left it to stay at the mill of the lord of Montbartier (from #70, in 1583 the lord of Montbartier was Baron Bernard d'Astorg whose wife was Anne d'Astorg), which is located at a place unknown to us. We may imagine that Bertrand then received an important order for carpenter work on this mill and decided to move there to do the work.
    Person ID I1261  mytree
    Last Modified 16 Jul 2017 

    Father Jehan Latrobe,   b. Abt 1531,   d. Bef 1596  (Age ~ 64 years) 
    Relationship Natural 
    Mother Plazen Albépar,   b. Abt 1540 
    Relationship Natural 
    Married Bef 1565  Monbéqui, Tarn-et-Garonne, Midi-Pyrénées, France Find all individuals with events at this location  [2
    Notes 
    • At this time, we know of seven children of Jehan Latrobe and Plazen Albépar, presumably all of them since their dates of birth are placed at regular intervals from around 1565 to 1576. Note that the parochial registers for recording the christenings, marriages and burials only started around 1567 in this area which is the reason why nothing can be found about the christenings of the first two children.
    Family ID F633  Group Sheet

    Family Anne Gasc,   b. 1567, Montauban, Tarn-et-Garonne, Midi-Pyrénées, France Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Marriage Contract 26 Jul 1584  [5
    the house of Pierre Gasc in Fossat les Montauban, France 
    Married 19 Aug 1584  Villenouvelle de Fossat lez Montauban, France Find all individuals with events at this location  [6
    Notes 
    • As the signing of the marriage contract between Bertrand Latrobe and Anne Gasc took place in Pierre Gasc's home, instead of the house of Anne's father, Hugues, the most plausible assumption is that Pierre Gasc was Anne's grandfather. Bertrand Latrobe was emancipated by his father, Jehan Latrobe, the same day.
    Children 
    +1. Jean Latrobe,   b. Bef 27 Oct 1585,   d. Bef 1654  (Age < 68 years)
    +2. Jean Latrobe,   b. Abt 20 Aug 1588, Villenouvelle de Fossat lez Montauban, France Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Bef 1633  (Age ~ 44 years)
    +3. Pierre Latrobe,   b. Bef 7 Oct 1590, Villenouvelle de Fossat lez Montauban, France Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1667  (Age 76 years)
     4. Marie Latrobe,   b. Bef 30 Mar 1593, Villenouvelle de Fossat lez Montauban, France Find all individuals with events at this location
     5. Jacquette Latrobe,   b. 20 May 1595, Villenouvelle de Fossat lez Montauban, France Find all individuals with events at this location
    +6. Jean Latrobe,   b. 8 Nov 1597, Villenouvelle de Fossat lez Montauban, France Find all individuals with events at this location,   bur. Aug 1646, Monbéqui, Tarn-et-Garonne, Midi-Pyrénées, France Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 48 years)
     7. Pierre Latrobe,   b. 8 Dec 1599, Villenouvelle de Fossat lez Montauban, France Find all individuals with events at this location
     8. Marie Latrobe,   b. 29 Aug 1604
     9. Jacques Latrobe,   b. 3 Apr 1607
    +10. Jehan Latrobe,   b. 19 Oct 1612, Villenouvelle de Fossat lez Montauban, France Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Bef 1667  (Age < 54 years)
    Last Modified 16 Jul 2017 
    Family ID F618  Group Sheet

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsBorn - Abt 1565 - Monbéqui, Tarn-et-Garonne, Midi-Pyrénées, France Link to Google Earth
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    Pin Legend  : Address       : Location       : City/Town       : County/Shire       : State/Province       : Country       : Not Set

  • Sources 
    1. [S95] Michel de Lafon-Boutary, #75 (1585), #76 (1588), #77 (1590), #82 (1593), #85 (1595), #92(1597), #103 (1599), #136 & #140 (1604), #148 (1607), #178 & #179(1612), #195 (1616), #199 (1618), #205 & #209 (1620), #283 (1638).

    2. [S95] Michel de Lafon-Boutary, #49 (1565).

    3. [S95] Michel de Lafon-Boutary, #239 (1630).

    4. [S105] Papers of Robert Penel, #213 (1621).

    5. [S95] Michel de Lafon-Boutary, #74 (1584).

    6. [S95] Michel de Lafon-Boutary, #73 (1584).


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