Jean Latrobe

Male Bef 1555 - Abt 1612  (57 years)


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  • Name Jean Latrobe  [1, 2
    Born Bef 1555  Monbéqui, Tarn-et-Garonne, Midi-Pyrénées, France Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Male 
    Occupation Bef Nov 1612  Monbéqui, Tarn-et-Garonne, Midi-Pyrénées, France Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Farmer 
    Died Abt Nov 1612  Monbéqui, Tarn-et-Garonne, Midi-Pyrénées, France Find all individuals with events at this location  [2, 3
    Will 31 Oct 1621  Monbéqui, Tarn-et-Garonne, Midi-Pyrénées, France Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Notes 
    • After Jean's death his legatee and brother, Pierre Latrobe, according to the will turned over furniture to his widow, Antoinette Darenes on 12 November 1612. Her son, Yzac Latrobe, farmer, was present In spite of his Christian name being the most important one in reference to the family tradition, Jean Latrobe was undoubtedly the youngest son of Jehan Latrobe and Gailharde Benoist, because in the two archive pieces (#108 dated 1601 - Jean-Pierre Benoist cited here should most probably be a first cousin - and #141 dated 1604) where he is named together with his brother, Pierre, he is coming as second. From the information available today, we have concluded that his father died when he was a very small boy, and that together with his mother and his brother, Pierre, he lived at his uncle Jehan Latrobe's house. Uncle Jehan Latrobe was the royal notary who introduced the new ideas of Protestantism into the family.

      Consequently Jean was educated within the Protestant Religion. Jean spent his whole life in Monbéqui as a farmer, a traditional activity of many generations of his ancestors.

      On 31 Oct 1612, Jean signed a will where he named his brother, Pierre, as his universal legatee (see #180). We now know the reason for that was that Jean had had no children. In his will, Jean declared he wanted to die as a Catholic and be buried in his ancestors' grave in Monbéqui. Therefore, apparently when death came nearer he changed his Religion from the one of his youth. To understand his change of religion, we have to resituate it within the general historical context and his own story.

      By the end of Oct 1612, it is two and half years after Henri IV was assassinated by Ravaillac. As his son, Louis XIII, was then only 11 years old and therefore still too young, the royal power went into the hands of his widow, Marie de Medici, a strong Catholic, acting as regent of the kingdom. Fourteen years after the Edict of Nantes of 1598, the Henri IV's policy of tolerance was more or less forgotten, and the Catholic forces had taken advantage of the King's assassination to restart persecuting the Huguenots, a movement which finally led Louis XIII to order his army to besiege Montauban in 1621.

      Of course the Montauban area, one of the few fortresses held by the Huguenots according to the Edict of Nantes, was deeply affected by this general tendency. Presumably Jean was impressed by the movement and ideas of the Counter-Reformation. He might have feared to be punished by God because of his Protestant faith, which was not even the one of his father, but that of his uncle. With the psychology of that time his change is quite understandable.
    Person ID I5535  mytree
    Last Modified 16 Jul 2017 

    Father Jehan Latrobe,   b. Abt 1529,   d. Bef Aug 1555  (Age ~ 26 years) 
    Relationship Natural 
    Mother Gailharde Benoist,   b. Abt 1530 
    Relationship Natural 
    Married Abt 1550  Monbéqui, Tarn-et-Garonne, Midi-Pyrénées, France Find all individuals with events at this location  [4
    Notes 
    • Three spellings of her surname appear within the documentation, Benoist (which is French), Benetz (which is Occitan), and Benech (which might be the French spelling of the Occitan pronunciation). We have kept the first one because this surname appears elsewhere (for instance in #51, 1567) as a surname already existing within the Montauban area at that time and because the other two forms seem to be more phonetic transcriptions of incorrect pronunciations than real Occitan spellings.
    Family ID F2296  Group Sheet

    Family Antoinette Darenes 
    Married Bef 1578  [2, 5
    Last Modified 16 Jul 2017 
    Family ID F2329  Group Sheet

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsBorn - Bef 1555 - Monbéqui, Tarn-et-Garonne, Midi-Pyrénées, France Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsOccupation - Farmer - Bef Nov 1612 - Monbéqui, Tarn-et-Garonne, Midi-Pyrénées, France Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsDied - Abt Nov 1612 - Monbéqui, Tarn-et-Garonne, Midi-Pyrénées, France Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsWill - 31 Oct 1621 - Monbéqui, Tarn-et-Garonne, Midi-Pyrénées, France Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Maps 
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    Pin Legend  : Address       : Location       : City/Town       : County/Shire       : State/Province       : Country       : Not Set

  • Sources 
    1. [S95] Michel de Lafon-Boutary, #141 (1604), #181 (1612).

    2. [S105] Papers of Robert Penel, #182 (1612).

    3. [S95] Michel de Lafon-Boutary, #180 & #181 (1612).

    4. [S95] Michel de Lafon-Boutary, #51 (1567).

    5. [S95] Michel de Lafon-Boutary, #180, #181 & #183 (1612).


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